Soleado Elementary

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Principal's Message

Dear Parents,

It has been observed and reported that the morning traffic has become dangerous and unsafe. I am compelled to remind our parents of the critical nature of driving in a school zone. Furthermore, I must insist that our parents remain mindful of and follow these simple rules:

Do not allow your children to cross traffic unescorted.  There is a blind spot at the top of the hill near the exit for the parking lot. When your children cross the exit on Flaming Arrow, either in the morning or the afternoon, there is a good chance that they will not be seen by oncoming traffic. In addition, most SUVs have a blind spot for small children. 
Do not go around traffic and drive against the flow of traffic for any reason. 

You are not allowed to pick up or drop off your children from the Kids' Corner parking lot during the school pick-up/drop-off times unless they are enrolled in the program.

In order to allow the pick-up to move more smoothly, only those parents who have a child in kinder, first, or second grade will be allowed in the parking lot before 2:55. If you are in the lot for an older student, you will be asked to drive back around and wait for the younger children to be picked up first.

You MAY NOT park in the school lot for any reason.  If you need to visit the office or pick up your child during the school pick-up/drop-off time, please park on the street and walk in.  
 
I realize that the tone of this message may seem a bit direct, but as your principal, I would be extremely saddened to have to draft a letter notifying the community that one of our students was struck by a car and either seriously injured or worse. Believe me when I say that there is nothing on any of our schedules that is more important than the safety of our children.


Thank you in advance for your cooperation as we work to maintain a safe and kind environment for all of the students at Soleado. Please feel free to contact me should you have any questions or concerns.

And on a completely different note . . . 

Kids Running Clipart

Our amazing FUN RUN is coming up. It's a super special and important Soleado event. Please join us in any way you can. Every little bit helps. Please see below for opportunities.

 

Fun Run Tshirt

Fun Run Sponsorship Have you seen all those great Fun Run shirts the kids are wearing? Of course you have because they're EVERYWHERE! Well, now is your chance to have your business featured on this year's shirt. Click here for the sponsorship form due February 17. Thank you to our returning sponsors like Joey's BBQ!

 

Fun Run is coming! Fun Run forms have gone home. Be sure to register online to share your child's private link with friends and family. Click here for registration instructions and some of the fun rewards our students can earn.  This is one of our biggest fundraisers. Every dollar counts. If we reach our school goal of $30,000, Mrs. Stutzel AND the teachers will get covered in silly string! 


Click here to see how much we've raised and which class is in the lead!
Need an additional pledge form? Click here.  

 

Mrs. Gina Stutzel   

Proud Principal of Soleado Elementary 
twitter @stutzelg

http://soleado.pvpusd.net/

12Feb18

Sun Border 
Past Principal Messages:

Dear Parents,

Give your child the time and space to think critically.

Critical thinking—the ability to go beyond basic knowledge and consider “the bigger picture”—is a crucial skill for school success. The better students are able to think critically, the more deeply they will grasp new concepts and ideas.

 

To promote these skills:
Let your child figure things out. Resist the urge to solve every problem. Instead, give them time to work through problems themselves. If they have forgotten what they are supposed to do for homework, don’t offer to email the teacher. Instead, ask, “How could you find out?” Can they call a classmate? Look over last night’s assignment for clues? Give them space to come up with a plan.


Discuss current events. Is there a news story that might interest them? Print out an article and chat about it over dinner. Find out what they think about the issue, but don’t stop there. Once they have shared their opinion, press them a bit. “I can see how you feel about this. But why do you think other people might feel differently?”

 

Encourage reflection. Once your child completes a big project for school, talk about it. Ask them, “How difficult was it to finish? Did you give yourself enough time to complete it?” Regardless of how the project went, reflecting on the process will help them hone their critical-thinking skills.

 

Reprinted with permission from the February 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!®

 

Mrs. Gina Stutzel   

Proud Principal of Soleado Elementary 
twitter @stutzelg

http://soleado.pvpusd.net/

05Feb18

Are you teaching your child to use time wisely?

 

Time management is an important skill for school success. The school year is half over, so now is a good time to take a few minutes to think about whether you are helping your child use their time wisely.

 

Answer yes or no to each of the questions below:

Have you reviewed your child’s homework and study schedule and made adjustments as necessary?

Do you use your family calendar to record dates for tests, projects, and extracurricular activities?

Do you try to keep a balance between your child’s activities and the rest of your lives? If your child is up past his bedtime every night finishing homework, it’s time to cut back.

Do you help your child break down big assignments into smaller chunks?

Do you make sure that your child has some time each day for fun or relaxation?

Reprinted with permission from the January 2018 issue of Parents make the difference! ®

 

Mrs. Gina Stutzel   

Proud Principal of Soleado Elementary 
twitter @stutzelg

http://soleado.pvpusd.net/

29JAN18

Boost Success by Promoting a Growth Mindset

School is filled with challenges—and your child’s success depends on how they respond to those challenges. Encourage them to develop what researchers call a growth mindset.

growth mindset determines how kids think about problems. Suppose, for example, your child is having trouble finding the answer to a math problem. Some kids would throw up their hands and say, “I’m not good at math!”—and quit trying. But, other kids would take another view - “This is a challenge and I love a challenge.”

Children in the second group have a growth mindset. They believe that even if they can’t do something now, they will be able to learn it in the future. They’re more likely to stick with the problem—and solve it.

You can encourage this mindset by praising your child’s effort. “That project was challenging, but you stuck with it and finished it!”

Reprinted with permission from the January 2018 issue of Parents make the difference!® (Elementary School Edition) newsletter.

We are using the Growth Mindset philosophy at Soleado and encourage all of our families to learn more about how they can implement this mindset into their lives as well.  A great place to start is clicking on this link: 
https://www.mindsetkit.org/topics/about-growth-mindset/what-is-growth-mindset

I encourage you to watch the short clip together as a family to better understand how you can help each other develop a Growth Mindset philosophy.

 

  

Mrs. Gina Stutzel   

Proud Principal of Soleado Elementary 
twitter @stutzelg

http://soleado.pvpusd.net/

14Jan18

Welcome to the New Year Soleado Families! 

One of my resolutions is to make sure that I share valuable, measurable, and beneficial information with my students and their families.  I would like to start the year with a message that will make sense to all of us…attendance!  One of the most vital parts of your child’s education is also one that’s easy to overlook. It’s attendance! Study after study shows that when kids regularly miss school, their learning, and especially their literacy skills, take a serious hit. Not only that, young students with poor attendance tend to turn into older students with poor attendance. Don’t let your child become one of them!

To keep your child on the road to school success consider these recommendations:

Take attendance seriously. As the parent, you set the tone. So be sure your child understands how much you value school and learning. If attendance is a priority for you, it will be a priority for them.

Prepare at night. In the evening, help your child set out everything they need to take to school the next day—their backpack, completed homework, proper shoes, signed papers, etc. They should also pick out their outfit and decide what they will have for breakfast.
 
Respect the school calendar. When possible, avoid scheduling appointments or family vacations that conflict with school. It will remind your child that there’s nowhere more important for them to be during the week than in school!

Talk to your child’s teacher if you are experiencing problems that often result in school absences. Many families face challenges with health, child care, transportation and other issues. We are here to help any way we can to make attendance a priority for your child. 
 
Thank you for supporting your child and making them your number one priority.  Your dedication and commitment to their education now, will result in a happy healthy adult!

 

Mrs. Gina Stutzel   

Proud Principal of Soleado Elementary 
twitter @stutzelg

http://soleado.pvpusd.net/

08Jan18